The heroin crisis is so bad in one US county that there were 16 overdoses in one day

Washington county is nestled on the southwestern edge of Pennsylvania, bordering West Virginia. It has a population that just surpasses the 200,000 mark, and yet every day between five and eight of its inhabitants overdose on heroin.

Last weekend, the county experienced one of its worse overdose epidemics. In just 24 hours, 16 people overdosed. Over the whole weekend, 25 overdosed and three died, The Washington Post reports.

Every day in the US, an average of 110 people die from legal and illegal drug overdoses, according to The Post. Many of the Washington county people who overdosed were saved by the fact that all paramedics now carry a fast-acting antidote called naloxone.

Rick Gluth, a supervising detective on a Washington county drug task force, told The Washington Post that there had been a gradual increase in the number of overdoses over the last two years and that things “just went out of control.”

“I’ve been a police officer for 27 years and worked narcotics for the last 15, and this is the worst. I’d be glad to have the crack epidemic back,” Gluth said.

The number of heroin addicts in the US has sharply risen over the last decade, and, with it, the number of fatal heroin overdoses has gone up, too. Heroin use has doubled among young adults in the past 10 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In some parts of the US, the problem has gotten so bad that maternity wards have now startedinstalling special units to wean newborns off drugs due to the increasing number of mothers taking drugs while pregnant.

When injected, heroin turns into morphine, which causes the body to become extremely relaxed and decreases the sense of pain. One of the reasons people die from a heroin overdose is that their body forgets to breathe.

“Heroin makes someone calm and a little bit sleepy, but if you take too much then you can fall asleep, and when you are asleep your respiratory drive shuts down,” Dr. Karen Drexler, the former director of the addiction-psychiatry residency-training program at Emory University, told CNN. Heroin overdoses also cause heart failures and extreme blood-pressure drops.

washington county pennsylvania

The demographic of heroin users has been changing over the last decade. Since many heroin users become hooked after being prescribed painkillers known as opioids, a lot of middle-class people are now addicted. As a result, the drug is bought and sold in accessible places like bars, nightclubs, and homes.

Gluth told The Washington Post that in Washington county, heroin is much cheaper than prescription drugs. Prescription drugs can cost $20 for a single dose, while heroin sells for $8 for a stamp bag.

 

 

WHOOPI GOLDBERG LAUNCHES MEDICAL-MARIJUANA PRODUCTS TARGETED AT MENSTRUAL CRAMPS

“I have grown granddaughters who have severe cramps, so I said this is what I want to work on.”

Goldberg announced Wednesday that she’s launching a medical-marijuana company with Maya Elisabeth, one of the leading “canna-businesswomen” in the field, with a line of products designed to provide relief from menstrual cramps.

The company, Maya & Whoopi, will offer cannabis edibles, tinctures, topical rubs, and a THC-infused bath soak that it describes as “profoundly relaxing.” Frankly that last one, even though your humble reporter is a man, sounds incredible.

In an interview with Vanity Fair, The View co-host said she wanted to create a product for women that was discreet, provided relief, and wouldn’t leave you glued to your couch.

“For me, I feel like if you don’t want to get high high, this is a product specifically just to get rid of discomfort,” she says. “Smoking a joint is fine, but most people can’t smoke a joint and go to work.”

“This, you can put it in your purse,” Goldberg continues. “You can put the rub on your lower stomach and lower back at work, and then when you get home you can get in the tub for a soak or make tea, and it allows you to continue to work throughout the day.”

Goldberg has been outspoken about her medical-marijuana use in the past. In 2014, she wrote in The Cannabist about her love of her kush-filled vape pen, which she says gives her relief from glaucoma-related headaches without resorting to eating handfuls of Advil every day.

“I started using the vape pen because I stopped smoking cigarettes about four years ago and discovered I couldn’t smoke a joint anymore,” she says. “The relief that I got with the vape pen was kind of different from what I got with smoking. I could control it much better.”

If it worked so well for headaches, surely it could be applied to other aches, so Goldberg got in touch with a couple of industry experts to see if there was already anything on the medical-marijuana market for cramps. They told her no, because it was seen as a niche.

At this point in the interview, Goldberg stops to give an exasperated chuckle.

“Hey, this niche is half the population on the earth,” she says. “This seems to be people flippantly blowing you off, which is what you get whenever you start talking about cramps. They weren’t thinking how do you target this? I have grown granddaughters who have severe cramps, so I said this is what I want to work on.”

Goldberg then got in touch with Elisabeth, the owner of the female-run medical-marijuana cannabis company Om Edibles in northern California, and the two were off to the races.

Half the population of earth, male or female, isn’t using marijuana for now, but the market is booming. Washington state did nearly half a billion dollars in marijuana sales its first year after legalization, and some projections predict it will be a $20 billion industry in the U.S. by 2020.

Goldberg stands by her product for the same reason she favors it over painkillers for headaches. She says you’ll be able to look at the ingredients on any Whoopi & Maya package and know exactly what’s in it. (Queen Victoria, by the way, supposedly used a marijuana tincture to relieve menstrual cramps, so it basically has the seal of approval from the British royalty.)

For those who don’t have much experience in the field, Whoopi & Maya will also include products with only cannabidiol (CBD), which lacks the euphoric effects commonly associated with marijuana. The whole line is scheduled to be available in April. For now, thanks to the patchwork of state medical-marijuana laws and the continuing federal ban on the substance, it will only be available in California.

Bergen Prosecutor: 325 Arrested In Multi-County Heroin Sweep

Bergen County Prosecutor John L. Molinelli, Acting Morris County Prosecutor Fredric M. Knapp,and Passaic County Prosecutor Camelia M. Valdes announced the results of a three County Heroin Task Force Initiative in the City of Paterson.  The Initiative lasted 8 weeks, starting on April 7, 2014 and ending on May 30, 2014
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Beginning last month, officers from the multi-jurisdictional drug task force targeted the “open air” heroin markets in Paterson, New Jersey.

During the course of the operation, officers arrested approximately 280 heroin users. In addition to identifying the dealers of those arrested, task force officers presented those arrested with rehabilitation options. In total, the task force identified and arrested over 40 heroin dealers and executed search warrants at several residences. During these arrests and search warrants, detectives seized thirty-two (32) guns, approximately $25,000 in U.S. currency, and approximately 1200 grams of raw, powder heroin. The raw heroin, when packaged for street sale, would yield approximately 60,000 bags of heroin. The total street value of the seized heroin is well over $350,000.00. Task force officers also dismantled 2 heroin “mills” where heroin was being packaged and stamped for sale on the streets of Paterson.

This initiative represents the continued commitment of the Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office to partner with other law enforcement agencies to proactively combat the current heroin epidemic facing our communities in a holistic manner that includes a combination of enforcement, rehabilitation, and education.

As part of the Heroin Task Force Initiative, members of the Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office joined a task force of law enforcement officers from  Morris, Passaic and Sussex counties to combat the heroin epidemic affecting our counties.

The initiative focused on heroin sales occurring in Paterson, New Jersey, which according to the United States Drug Enforcement Agency, supplies the most pure and potent heroin in the United States.  Tactics utilized during the initiative included surveillance, interdiction and arrests of buyers and sellers of heroin, undercover operations, deployment of an overdose response team to aggressively pursue the drug dealers who supplied the narcotics related to the overdoses, direct contact with the users’ families to help them focus on treatment, and exposing the heroin epidemic to the public through cooperation with the media.

 

The following is a list provided by the Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office of those arrested

Name Age Town of Residency Charges
Alyssa Santana 22 Prospect Park, NJ Possession of Heroin
Shakar Bragg 26 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin
Zikeme Brooks 21 Paterson, NJ Possession Heroin w/lntent to Distribute
Dillon Erik 19 West Milford, NJ Possession of Heroin
Andrew Martin 24 Wayne, NJ Possession of Heroin
Roman Zaytsev 20 Pompton Lakes, NJ Possession of Heroin
Greg Falone 38 Haledon, NJ Possession of Heroin, Possession of Crack
Jessica Wood 27 Hewitt, NJ Possession of Heroin
Brendan Turner 22 Hewitt, NJ Possession of Heroin
DarrinWard 22 Paterson, NJ Distribution of Heroin
Anton Porter 27 Paterson, NJ Distribution of Heroin
Destruction of Evidence (swallowed and
Kevin Hess 25 Wayne, NJ hospitalized), Possession of Hypodermic Syringes
Joyann Demont 23 Haledon, NJ Possession of Heroin
Gregory Gizinski 26 Prospect Park, NJ Possession of Heroin
Tatakneisha White 40 Paterson, NJ Distribution of Heroin
James Brown 45 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin
Eluding. Resisting Arrest, Heroin Paraphernalia,
Miguel Diaz 51 Wayne, NJ Under the Influence
Vashon Daniels 24 Paterson, NJ Receiving Stolen Property
Kristen Walsh 26 Clifton, NJ Possession of Heroin Paraphernalia
David Holtman 35 West Milford, NJ Possession of Heroin
Azmera Williams 20 Paterson, NJ Robbery, Possession Heroin with Intent
Jamar Coleman 26 Paterson, NJ Robbery, Possession with Intent
Christopher Stamp 24 Paterson, NJ Robbery, Possession with Intent
John Franken 22 Clifton, NJ Possession of Heroin
Timothy Preziosi 21 Bloomingdale, NJ Possession of Heroin, Possession of Crack
Nikki Zampese 20 Hewitt, NJ Possession of Heroin
Drew Peterson 31 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin, Possession of Crack
Richard Sheerin 43 Paterson, NJ Possession Heroin wI Intent to Distribute
John Franken III 32 Clifton, NJ Possession of Heroin
Stewart Platt 42 Paterson, NJ Possession Heroin w/lntent to Distribute
Mohammed Khalil 25 Clifton, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jason Wright 23 Paterson, NJ Possession Heroin wl/ntent to Distribute
Kawaan McGriff 24 Paterson, NJ Possession Heroin w/lntent to Distribute
Robert Pritchard 29 Pompton lakes, NJ Possession of Heroin
Tracy Hutchinson 28 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin
John Bunkoski 38 Lincoln Park, NJ Possession of Heroin
Arthur Fornal 36 Parlin, NJ Possession of Heroin
Stanley Whitlock 23 Paterson, NJ Possession Heroin w/lntent to Distribute
Shalik Buffaloe 29 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin
Rosanna Hazin 30 Clifton, NJ Possession of Heroin
Richard McCloud 27 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin
Kimberly Gaston 43 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin
Kevin Kajar 31 West Milford, NJ Possession of Heroin
Debra Varesi 39 Haledon, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jaime Lazcano 26 Little Falls, NJ Possession of Heroin
Michael Prisco 40 Elmwood Park, NJ Possession of Heroin
carlos Brito 43 Haledon, N.I Possession of Heroin with the Intent
David Summers 41 Haskell, NJ Possession of Crack Cocaine; Endangering Child
Matthew Singer Pompton Lakes, NJ Possession of Heroin
Destiny Jackson 23 Paterson, NJ Possession Heroin w/intent to Distribute
Anthony caraballo 38 Passaic, NJ Possession of Heroin
Laura Rivera-Flores 33 Clifton, NJ Possession of Heroin
ZuriGlover 20 Paterson, NJ Possession Heroin w/lntent to Distribute
Rashon Alexander Paterson, NJ Possession Heroin w/lntent to Distribute
Rhea Schwenk 32 Bloomingdale, NJ Possession of Heroin
Richard Miller 2S Wayne,NJ Possession of Heroin/Suboxone/Syringe
Krystal Chironis 18 Wayne,NJ Possession of Heroin/Possession of Crack
Isiah Canaday Paterson, NJ Distribution of Heroin and Crack Cocaine
Linda Ramirez 38 Clifton, NJ Possession of Heroin
Fermin Espinal 41 Paterson, NJ Possession Heroin w/lntent to Distribute
Rahnieda Zemoja 65 Passaic, NJ Possession of Heroin
Dianne Dimodica 49 Clifton, NJ Possession of Heroin; Possession of Crack
Sarah Link 27 Hawthorne, NJ Possession of Heroin
Danny Belous 33 Bloomingdale, NJ Possession of Heroin
Anthony Mosely 42 Paterson, NJ Distribution of Heroin
Dequan Jackson 31 Paterson, NJ Distribution of Heroin
Logan Siska 24 Wayne,NJ Possession of Heroin
Justin Alford 21 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin with Intent
Jennifer Waden 30 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin
Gina Giordano 24 Lyndhurst, NJ Possession of Heroin
Dylan Van Ordan 29 Hewitt, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jerry Byrd III 51 Paterson, NJ Distribution of Heroin
Shakim Gee 22 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin
Kevin SOmers 28 Hewitt, NJ Possession of Heroin
Christopher Cross 36 Paterson, Nl Distribution of CDS (HerOin/Crack)
Allen Higgins 28 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin
Pedro Santiago 45 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin/Crack w/lntent
Ryan Collins 30 Wayne,NJ Possession of Heroin
Kendrick Thompson 43 Haledon, NJ Possession of Heroin w/lntent
Altimont Hacker 25 Paterson, NJ Distribution of Heroin; Poss. W /Intent
leddie Wilson 56 Paterson, NJ Distribution of Heroin
Hashim Burroughs 37 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin w/lntent; Firearm
Ralph Rivera 56 Hawthorne, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jose Otero 49 Prospect Park, NJ Possession of Heroin
Ricky Wilson 42 Paterson, Nl Distribution of Heroin and Crack Cocaine
James Avant 54 Paterson, NJ Distribution of Heroin and Crack Cocaine
Elizabeth Mckoy 33 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin
Marco Rodriguez 34 Prospect Park, NJ Possession of Heroin
Kurt Petsch 18 Haskell, NJ Possession of Heroin; Possession of K-2
Samantha Tunison 21 Butler, NJ Possession of Heroin; Possession of K-2
Lisa Jedele 49 Woodland Park, NJ Possession of Heroin
Lavar Gamble 31 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin w/lntent
Richard Brimley 26 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin w/lntent
Jacklyn Daly 27 Totowa, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jashema Young 2S Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin
Deonte Mitchell 16 Paterson, NJ Distribution/Poss. w/lntent Heroin
Carolyn Cooks 52 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin
Maurice Bulls SS Paterson, NJ Distribution of Heroin
Dewayne Robinson 4S Little Falls, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jesus Dejesus 51 Paterson, NJ Dist. of Heroin; Pass. W/lntent Cocaine
John Petsu 24 Cedar Grove, NJ Possession of Heroin
WayneBal 33 Pompton Lakes, NJ Poss. Heroin/Eluding/Evidence Tamper
Stephanie Jowett 22 Bloomingdale, NJ Possession of Heroin
Princess Brown 27 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin w/lntent
Kyle Laforgia 28 West Milford, NJ Eluding; Weapons
Christopher Defina 33 Haledon, NJ Possession of Heroin
Christopher Allison 34 Fair Lawn, NJ Possession of Heroin
Datham Alston 22 Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin w/lntent
Aner Luperson Paterson, NJ Possession of Heroin w/lntent
Michael Laski 18 Hewitt, NJ Possession of Heroin
Kyle Jeroleman 21 Ledgewood, NJ Possession of Heroin
Bryan Good 22 Mt. Arlington, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jessica Demarest 22 Mt. Arlington, NJ Possession of Heroin
Deena Grieco 28 Hopatcong, NJ Possession of Heroin
Ryan Sheridan 21 Hopatcong, NJ Possession of Hemin
Michael Dean 21 Hopatcong, NJ Possession of Heroin
KeliManzini 33 Rockaway, NJ Possession of Heroin
Matthew Constantine 20 Dover, NJ Possession of Heroin
Eric Larcen 28 Piarsippany, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jason Mal 27 Rockaway, NJ Possession of Heroin
Rikki Bell 18 take Hopatcong, NJ Possession of Heroin
John Scavone 20 Lake Hopatcong, NJ Possession of Heroin
Peter Vaneck 23 Hockaway, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jordan Russo 21 Oak Ridge, NJ Possession of Heroin
Anthony Uvenio 30 Budd Lake, NJ Possession of Heroin
RoryMahon 20 Andover, NJ Possession of Heroin
Steven Goettlich 20 Florham Park, NJ Possession of Heroin Paraphernalia
Mark Kaska 21 Lake Hopatcong, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jeremy Paxos 22 Kenvil. NJ Possession of Heroin
Jason Carr 27 Pompton Plains, NJ Possession of Heroin
Amanda Caravaglia 22 Morristown, NJ Possession of Heroin
Michael Ryan 23 Madison, NJ Possession of Heroin
Shane Jouas 23 Succasunna, NJ Possession of Heroin
Philip Benevenga 24 Montville, NJ Possession of Heroin
Ryan Bills 48 Denville, NJ Possession of Heroin
Justin Huber 31 Pequannock, NJ Possession of Heroin
Joseph Fruedeman 27 Lake Hiawatha, NJ Possession of Heroin
Eric Castellanos 26 Budd Lake, NJ Possession of Heroin
Alyssa Esposito 24 Lake Hopatcong, NJ Possession of Heroin
oger Crane (co-defendant A. E~)sit 19 Lake Hopatcong, NJ Possession of Heroin
Donald McConnell 28 Hopatcong, NJ Possession of Heroin
Lauren Sbarra 20 Rockaway, NJ Possession of Heroin
Matthew Miller 25 Montville, NJ Possession of Heroin
Franklin D. Pettigrew Jr. S3 Wharton, NJ Possession of Heroin
Janet E. Erdmann 41 Wharton, NJ Possession of Heroin
Ryan Ventura 22 Montville, NJ Possession of Heroin
Nilda Albino 31 Garfield, NJ Possession of Heroin
Dwayne Dunlap 29 Lodi, NJ Possession of Heroin
Monai Steed 21 Teaneck, NJ Possession Heroin w/lntent to Distribute
Scott Duarte 22 Norwood, NJ Possession of Heroin
Gianni Delgaudio 21 Edgewater, NJ Possession of Heroin
Nicholas Barra 46 Rochelle Park, NJ Possession of Heroin
Fred Worthington 57 Fairview, NJ Possession of Heroin
Tanya White 46 Garfield, NJ Possession of Heroin
Y~ung Lewis 36 Hackensack, NJ Possession of Heroin
M~lria Orgioli 25 Garfield, NJ Possession of Heroin
Chris Loprieno 20 Oradell, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jerome Derenzo 21 Woodcliff, NJ Possession of Heroin
Mohareb Kharoufeh 25 Cliffside Park, NJ Possession of Heroin
Daniel Jozanovic 25 Fairview, NJ Possession of Heroin
Steven Dahmer 25 Dumont, NJ Possession of Heroin
Philip Sosebee 21 Ridgewood, NJ Possession of Heroin
Thomas Dipiano 28 Hackensack, NJ Possession of Heroin
Joseph Orrego 31 Lyndhurst, NJ Distribution of Heroin
Melanie Guskin 33 Lodi, NJ Possession of Heroin
Brian Dack 24 Mahwah, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jamie Finn 26 Oakland, NJ Possession of Roxicet
Tiffany Gaines 18 Teaneck, NJ Distribution of Heroin
Brian Kowa/chok 46 Garfield, NJ Possession of Heroin
Sean Dixon 21 Dumont, NJ Possession Heroin w/lntent to Distribute
Erin Morrissey 22 Dumont, NJ Possession of Heroin w/lntent to Distribute
Kristy Degroat 3S Little Ferry, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jordan Conahan 21 Teaneck, NJ Possession of Heroin
Robert Vanhook 23 East Rutherford, NJ Possession of Heroin
amie Vankell (co-defendant Vanhoo 24 East Rutherford, NJ Possession of Heroin
Danielle Guglietto 23 Lodi, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jessica Gostissa 21 Frcmklin lakes, NJ Possession of Heroin
Rodney Fairley 25 Elmwood Park, NJ Robbery/Possession w Intent Heroin
Ronald Williams 4S Hackensack, NJ Poss wllntent to Distribute(Cocaine-Heroin)
Matthew Corrado 24 Hackensack,NJ Possession of Heroin and Crack Cocaine
Aaron Reinert 32 Hillsdale, NJ Possession of Heroin
Michael Nowak 26 Lodi, NJ Possession of Heroin, Possession of Xanax
Daniel Burri 30 Mahwah,NJ Possession of Heroin, Possession of Crack
James Cogan 29 Tenafly,NJ Possession of Heroin Paraphernalia
Anthony Yocavelli 29 Hackensack, NJ Possession of Heroin
Ryan Strobel 30 Washington Township, NJ Possession of Heroin
Michael Goursky 22 Emerson, NJ Possession of Heroin
William Chenet 22 Fort lee, NJ Possession of Heroin
Melih Karabas 25 Lodi, NJ Possession of Heroin
Dylan Oschanski 21 Saddle Brook, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jayson Oviedo 32 Saddle Brook, NJ Possession of Heroin
Daniel Morrill 22 Oakland, NJ Possession of Heroin, Possession of Crack
lindsey Manzelli 19 River Edge, NJ Possession of Heroin
Brian Dymkowski 23 Garfield, NJ Possession of Heroin
Steven Bemstein 29 Elmwood Park, NJ Possession of Heroin
Tyler Molnar 22 Saddle Brook, NJ Possession of Heroin and Crack Cocaine
David Monteforte 26 Fairview, NJ Possession of Heroin
Christopher Loprieno 21 Oradell, NJ Possession of Heroin
Matthew Bavlitschko 22 River Edge, NJ Possession of Heroin
John Vonborstel 41 Paramus, NJ Possession of Heroin
Kenneth Feola 42 New Milford, NJ Possession of Heroin
Joseph Wysocki 21 Saddle Brook, NJ Possession of Heroin
Ryan Cooper 28 Ridgewood, NJ Possession of Heroin
Edward Mchale 27 Rutherford, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jesse Guido 28 Fairview, NJ Possession of Heroin
Bryan Silvestre 34 Hackensack, NJ Possession of Heroin
Desiree Bailey 23 Garfield, NJ Possession of Heroin
Boris Spektor 25 Wallington, NJ Possession of Heroin
Bryant Novak 18 Mahwah, NJ Possession of Heroin
Joseph Muti 20 Dumont, NJ Possession of Heroin
Philip Beahm 21 Rivervale, NJ Possession of Heroin
Daniel Spinella 31 Little Ferry, NJ Possession of Heroin
Cartlyn Rumbaugh 2S Bergenfield, NJ Possession of Heroin
Ilandy Pino 35 Garfield, NJ Possession of Heroin
Owen Palmer 26 Carlstadt, NJ Possession of Heroin with Intent
Bryan Dymkowski 23 Garfield, NJ Possession of Heroin
Candace Alvarez 37 Elmwood Park, NJ Possession of Heroin
Cynthia McDowell 38 Hackensack, NJ Possession of Heroin
Heather Rosenberg 24 Lodi, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jodi Calabrese 25 Bogota, NJ Possession of Heroin
Brian Silvestri 24 Hackensack, NJ Possession of Heroin
loannis Papachristoudis 29 lyndhurst, NJ Possession of Heroin
Christopher Durfee 29 Ramsey, NJ Possession of Heroin
Piotr Maleszewski 33 lyndhurst, NJ Possession of Heroin
Daniel Gallagher 29 Fair lawn, NJ Possession of Heroin
Tanya Stevens 43 Hackensack, NJ Possession of Heroin
Robert Manzi 45 Emerson, NJ Possession of Heroin
Patrick Mooney 21 Ridgewood, NJ Possession of Heroin
Amanda Tukendorf 20 Woodridge, NJ Possession of Heroin
Joseph Avola Jr. 24 Lodi, NJ Possession of Heroin
Christopher Langlois 40 Fair Lawn, NJ Possession of Heroin
Adam Giblin 24 Hasbrouck Heights, NJ Possession of Heroin
Susan Gibbons 47 Lodi, NJ Possession of Heroin;Eluding; Agg Assault
Jessica Moss 30 Leonia, NJ Possession of Heroin
Wojciech Wyka 21 Garfield, NJ Possession of Heroin
Teodora Zigik 21 Garfield, NJ Possession of Heroin
Michael Zottarelli 24 Lodi, NJ Possession of Heroin
Philip Sosebee 21 Ridgewood, NJ Possession of Heroin/Paraphernalia
Ethan Lis 20 Glen Rock, NJ Possession of Heroin/Paraphernalia
Steve Hegewald 41 Paramus, NJ Possession of Heroin
Devon cawley 26 Broadheadsville, PA Possession of Heroin
Michael Krempel 24 Beechwood, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jennifer Comune 23 Toms River, NJ Possession of Heroin
Sean Macko 29 Secaucus, NJ Possession of Herem, Possession of Percocet
Ericka Macko 27 Secaucus, NJ Possession of Heroin, Possession of Percocet
Briana Mattson 19 Hamburg, NJ Possession of Heroin
Michael Morelos 29 Sayerville, NJ Possession of Heroin
Salvatore cambria 32 Suffern NY Possession of Heroin
Juan Rosado 23 Newark, NJ Distribution of Heroin
Kathleen Pedulla 25 Toms River, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jacinda Moore 36 Wantage, NJ Possession of Heroin
Patrick Ninni 22 Hackettstown, NJ Possession of Heroin
Daniel Graham 26 Hackettstown, NJ Possession of Heroin
Brian Malloy 27 Nutlev, NJ Possession of Heroin
Russel Sienkiewicz 30 Sussex, NJ Possession of Heroin
Michael Wall 25 Sussex, NJ Possession of Heroin
Frank Aigotti 32 Wantage, NJ Possession of Heroin
William Lasala 34 Hamburg, NJ Possession of Heroin, Possession of Crack
Melissa White 25 Vernon, NJ Possession of Heroin, Possession of Crack
Richard Hill 29 Sloatsburg, NY Possession of Heroin, Possession of Crack
Mitchell Levine 54 Flemington, NJ Possession of Heroin, Possession of Crack
Matthew Kaczka 28 Bayonne, NJ Possession of Heroin
Luke Brenniser 20 Newton, NJ Possession of Heroin
Henry Henderson 20 Newton, NJ Possession of Heroin
Terrence Kelly 34 East Stroudsburg, PA Possession of Heroin
Brian Beck 27 Henryville, PA Possession of Heroin
Kcmdace Dippre 25 Henryville, PA Possession of Heroin with Intent to Distribute
Karen Machacek 31 Oxford, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jason Colavito 22 Raritan, NJ Possession of Heroin
James Salant 30 Stockton, NJ Possession of Heroin
Peter Melenciano 24 Jersey City, NJ Possession of Heroin with Intent to Distribute
Lance Beckman 26 Sparta, NJ Possession of Heroin
Victoria Cramer 23 Stanhope, NJ Possession of Heroin
George Bocchieri 32 Hamburg, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jeffrey Ryan 32 Franklin, NJ Possession of Heroin
Wontrez Higgs 22 Lexington, NC Possession of Heroin with Intent to Distribute
Vincent Kunze 21 Toms River, NJ Possession of Heroin; Possession of Crack
Rosemarie Argyropoulos 47 East Stroudsburg, PA Possession of Heroin w/lntent
Ann Marie Hughes 30 Vernon, NJ Possession of Heroin
Nicole Facciolo 31 Franklin, NJ Possession of Heroin
Miranda Reilly 42 Hamburg, NJ Possession of Heroin
Vincent Vicari 25 Scotch Plains, NJ Possession of Heroin
Robert Cuddeback 20 Warwick, NY Possession of Heroin
Michele Healy 22 Bronx, NY Possession of Heroin
Nicholas Deluca 25 Monroe, NY Possession of Heroin
Andrew Watts 33 Highland lakes, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jacquelin Kirdzik 41 Washington, NJ Possession of Heroin
Corrine Kirchner 26 Kearny, NJ Possession of Heroin
Kimberly Baird 22 Landing, Nj Possession of Heroin
John Petsu 34 Cedar Grove, NJ Possession of Heroin
Connor Herring 21 Flanders, NJ Possession of Heroin; Possession of Crack
Brian Howard 24 Hackettstown, NJ Possession of Heroin; Possession of Crack
Kennenth McCormick Stony Point, NY Hindering Apprehension
Laura Daguila 25 Glen Ridge, NJ Possession of Heroin
William Lembert 38 Bronx, NY Possession of Heroin w/lntent
William Varela 36 Nutley, NJ Possession of Heroin
William Dejesus 49 North Bergen, NJ Possession of Heroin
Julia Gerrity 20 Stroudsburg, PA Possession of Heroin
Nicholas Toso 25 Hardwick, NJ Possession of Heroin
Andrew Young 24 Stroudsburg, PA Possession of Heroin
Cheryl Taraski 26 Bayonne, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jack Fanburg 22 Livingston, NJ Possession of Heroin
Karley Rosenberg 25 High Bridge, NJ – Possession of Heroin
Valerie Wulffers 39 Newton, NJ Possession of Heroin
Dominique Defaria 34 Sussex, NJ Possession of Heroin
Miranda Reilly 42 Hamburg, NJ Possession of Heroin
Jessica Ellsworth 30 Newton, NJ Possession of Heroin
Michael Harmon 32 Pearl River, NY Possession of Heroin
Mark Wittrein 30 Newton, NJ Possession of Heroin
Michell Healey 32 Bronx, NY Possession of Heroin

The following agencies participated in the 2014 Heroin Initiative:
Bergen County Prosecutor’s Office
Passaic County Prosecutor’s Office
Morris County Prosecutor’s Office
Paterson Police Department
Bergen County Sheriff’s Office
Mahwah Police Department
Ridgewood Police Department
Butler Police Department
Fair Lawn Police Department
Fort Lee Police Department
Westwood Police Department
Hasbrouck Heights Police Department
Moonachie Police Department
Hawthorne Police Department
Woodcliff Lake Police Department
Wanaque Police Department
Montville Police Department
Ringwood Police Department
Wayne Police Department
Woodland Park Police Department
Montvale Police Department
West Milford Police Department
Upper Saddle River Police Department
South Hackensack Police Department
Teaneck Police Department
Waldwick Police Department
Ramsey Police Department
Allendale Police Department
Roxbury Police Department
Mount Olive Police Department
Vernon Police Department
Totowa Police Department
Tenafly Police Department
Dumont Police Department
Riverdale Police Department
Boonton Police Department
Lyndhurst Police Department
Lincoln Park Police Department
New Milford Police Department
Bloomingdale Police Department
Saddle Brook Police Department
Kinnelon Police Department
Hackensack Police Department
Morris County Park Police Department
Haworth Police Department

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Reversing Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Is Possible October 21, 2015 by Dana Trentini 80 Comments

ichelle heaeld herself of Hashimoto’s and Lupus and has been free of symptoms and antibodies since 2009. For over eight years, she has helped hundreds of people reverse chronic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions with her Functional Mind-Body programs.

Written by Michelle Corey, Author of The Thyroid Cure

When I reversed my Hashimoto’s and lupus in 2009, I wanted to shout it from the rooftops! All my miserable symptoms were gone. The inflammatory fat melted away; my hair and eyebrows grew back; and my rashes, sore joints and fatigue disappeared. I could finally think clearly and I felt vibrantly healthy for the first time in my life. I no longer had antibodies to my own tissues and I looked and felt ten years younger.

I’ve been free of symptoms and antibodies for over six years now. I haven’t experienced a single “relapse” or “flare up” and I feel great. According to both my medical doctor and endocrinologist, I’m “cured.”Reversing Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Is Possible

My healing was no coincidence. I spent over six years researching the science of the autoimmune process and what I discovered is that the immune system doesn’t just attack the body out of the blue. There are always multiple triggers and I had several of them. Once I was able to identify and remove the stresses on my immune system and restore the core systems of my body, I naturally healed.

By definition Hashimoto’s or Graves’ disease is the presence of antibodies. By “cure” I mean no more antibodies or autoimmune symptoms. I took a full dose of T4 and T3 while I was healing. Now I take a tiny amount of T3 every other day for longevity. Some of my clients have weaned off meds altogether, while some choose to stay on low dose for the same reasons I do.

We have to remember that thyroid medication does not treat the root cause of an autoimmune thyroid condition. Most people who simply take thyroid replacement continue to have raging antibodies and a progressive condition that eventually destroys the thyroid gland. In many cases the root autoimmune condition continues and causes damage to other systems and organs.

Stress and the Autoimmune Process

Scientists have demonstrated that all autoimmune conditions are essentially the same process: the inflamed immune system, under the strain of continual cellular stress (triggers), mistakes healthy tissue as foreign and begins to destroy it. 1 The only difference between various autoimmune conditions is which organ is attacked. With lupus, it can be the skin, the liver, the joints, etc. With type I diabetes, it’s the pancreas; with multiple sclerosis, it is the brain and spinal cord; and with ulcerative colitis, it is the large intestine and rectum.

In the case of Hashimoto’s and Graves’, the thyroid is the obvious target, but it’s important to note that it’s rarely just the thyroid being affected there are typically several underlying imbalances. An autoimmune thyroid condition is a full-body condition!

Throughout history people have known that stress makes you sick. While they may have lacked the “science,” ancient healing systems were built upon relieving stress and detoxing the body, thus restoring balance and health.

 

Today, scientists have found that both acute and chronic stressors directly affect the cells of your immune system, resulting in autoimmunity.

10 Ways Stress Can Trigger Autoimmunity

  1. Acute stress in any form (psychological and physical) can cause a rise in the stress hormones adrenaline and cortisol, which suppress T-cell activity.
  2. Chronic stress in any form can cause adrenal fatigue, which causes the hormones cortisol, adrenaline and norepinephrine to become depleted. This can allow immune system T-cells to get out of control, resulting in inflammation and an imbalance between T-cells and B-cells.2
  3. Chronic stress can impair methylation, which can suppress T-cell production. Impaired methylation of T-cells may be involved in the production of autoantibodies.3
  4. Chronic infectious stress can cause both B-cells and T-cells to be overproduced resulting in autoimmunity.4,5
  5. Gastrointestinal stress, perhaps caused by parasites, yeast or an overgrowth of bad bacteria, affects all the cells of your immune system, and disrupts the balance between T-regulator cells and Th1 and Th2 cells.6
  6. Food allergies and sensitivities, for instance to gluten, can cause B-cells to be overproduced, which may result in an accidental attack on healthy tissues.7
  7. Nutrient deficiency is a form of stress that can be at the root of an autoimmune response; for instance, selenium and iodine deficiencies have been found to cause thyroid inflammation, thus driving up the production of T-cells and B-cells.8
  8. Exposure to heavy metals can cause both T-cells and B-cells to be overproduced.9
  9. Certain medications and vaccinations can be “antigenic,” which means that the body produces antibodies to the substance, thus initiating an immune response. In some cases this can trigger an autoimmune response.10,11
  10. Literally thousands of environmental toxins from cleaning products and pesticides to dry cleaning fluids and plastics can become antigenic and trigger an autoimmune condition.12

While each of us is unique, I have found that people with autoimmune thyroid disorders have certain stressors in common such as chronic stress, nutrient deficiencies, food sensitivities, sluggish livers, leaky guts, inflammation, low-grade infections or viruses, and chemical or heavy metal toxicity.

It is possible to reverse an autoimmune thyroid condition, but you have to determine which of these stressors are your personal triggers and then work to heal them. Completely healing from Hashimoto’s or Graves’ isn’t always easy, but it’s possible. I have witnessed it over and over that the body will naturally move toward vibrant health when the stressors are removed and the core systems of the body restored to balance!

Hypothyroid Mom’s 3rd Anniversary GIVEAWAY!

To celebrate Hypothyroid Mom’s 3rd Anniversary, Michelle is offering 150 winners her book The Thyroid Cure – The Functional Mind-Body Approach to Reversing Your Autoimmune Condition and Reclaiming Your Health! YES you read that correctly! 150 people will win her book.

Enter for your chance to win by completing this form below. Your entry is free. Everyone in every country of the world is welcome to participate. The giveaway will end on Tuesday, October 27 at 9PM ET. The 150 winners will be contacted by email and listed here in this post. If you have difficulty entering the giveaway on a mobile device, try turning your mobile horizontally so that the giveaway fits on the screen with the login button visible.

About Michelle Corey

Michelle Corey, C.N.W.C., F.M.C., is a Wellness Recovery Expert, researcher and author of The Thyroid Cure – The Functional Mind-Body Approach to Reversing Your Autoimmune Condition and Reclaiming Your Health!

Michelle healed herself of Hashimoto’s and lupus and has been free of symptoms and antibodies since 2009. For over eight years, she has helped hundreds of people reverse chronic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. Her Functional Mind-Body programs are designed to guide people to recover wellness by balancing the core systems of the body through optimizing nutrition and detoxification, practices to release stress, letting go of the past, and connecting more fully to a life of spirit.

Michelle studied holistic nutrition at Clayton College of Natural Health and completed a comprehensive 2-year practical program at Academy of Functional Medicine and Genomics. She is Certified Nutrition and Wellness Consultant and Functional Medical Consultant. She is currently an advisor to the Academy of Functional Medicine and Genomics and the Functional Medical University, and a member of the Institute of Functional Medicine and the National Association of Healthcare Advocacy Consultants.

Michelle lives in beautiful Taos, New Mexico and offers Functional Mind-Body healing retreats, workshops and online courses.

References:

  1. Eggleton P. Stress protein–polypeptide complexes acting as autoimmune triggers. Clin Exp Immunol. 2003 October; 134(1): 6–8.
  2. Stojanovich L, Marisavljevich D. Stress as a trigger of autoimmune disease. Autoimmun Rev. 2008 Jan;7(3):209-13.
  3. Richardson B. DNA methylation and autoimmune disease. Clin Immunol. 2003 Oct;109(1):72-9.
  4. Ercolini A M, Miller S D. The role of infections in autoimmune disease. Clin Exp Immunol. 2009 January; 155(1): 1–15.
  5. Kivity S, Agmon-Levin N, Blank M, Shoenfeld Y. Infections and autoimmunity – friends or foes? Trends in Immunology – 1 August 2009 (Vol. 30, Issue 8, pp. 409-414)
  6. Velavan TP, Ojurongbe O. Regulatory T cells and parasites. J Biomed Biotechnol. 2011;201(1):520940.
  7. Biagi F, Pezzimenti D, Campanella J, Corazza GR. Gluten exposure and risk of autoimmune disorders. Gut. 2002;51(1):140–141.
  8. Negro R. Selenium and thyroid autoimmunity. Biologics. 2008 June; 2(2): 265–273.
  9. Bigazzi P E. Autoimmunity and Heavy Metals. Lupus December 1994 vol. 3 no. 6 449-453.
  10. Orbach H, Agmon-Levin N, Zandman-Goddard G. Vaccines and autoimmune diseases of the adult. Discov Med. 2010 Feb;9(45):90-7.
  11. Vial T, Descotes J. Autoimmune diseases and vaccinations. Eur J Dermatol. 2004 Mar-Apr;14(2):86-90.
  12. Burek C L, Monica V. Talor M V. Environmental Triggers of Autoimmune Thyroiditis. J Autoimmun. 2009 Nov–Dec; 33(3-4): 183–189.
  13. Reversing Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Is Possible

What Are the Symptoms of Fibromyalgia? and 6 Symptoms You Shouldn’t Ignore

What Are the Symptoms of Fibromyalgia?

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson,

Symptoms of fibromyalgia include:

  • Chronic muscle pain, muscle spasms, or tightness
  • Moderate or severe fatigue and decreased energy
  • Insomnia or waking up feeling just as tired as when you went tosleep
  • Stiffness upon waking or after staying in one position for too long
  • Difficulty remembering, concentrating, and performing simple mental tasks (“fibro fog”)
  • Abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, and constipation alternating withdiarrhea (irritable bowel syndrome)
  • Tension or migraine headaches
  • Jaw and facial tenderness
  • Sensitivity to one or more of the following: odors, noise, bright lights, medications, certain foods, and cold
  • Feeling anxious or depressed
  • Numbness or tingling in the face, arms, hands, legs, or feet
  • Increase in urinary urgency or frequency (irritable bladder)
  • Reduced tolerance for exercise and muscle pain after exercise
  • A feeling of swelling (without actual swelling) in the hands and feet

Fibromyalgia symptoms may intensify depending on the time of day — morning, late afternoon, and evening tend to be the worst times. Symptoms may also get worse with fatigue, tension, inactivity, changes in the weather, cold or drafty conditions, overexertion, hormonal fluctuations (such as just before your period or during menopause), stress, depression, or other emotional factors.

If the condition is not diagnosed and treated early, symptoms can go on indefinitely, or they may disappear for months and then recur.

Call Your Doctor About Fibromyalgia If:

You have chronic muscle pain and overwhelming fatigue.

6 Symptoms You Shouldn’t Ignore

By Kara Mayer Robinson

1. Weakness in Your Arms and Legs

If you get weak or numb in your arm, leg, or face, it can be a sign of astroke, especially if it’s on one side of your body.

You could also be having a stroke if you can’t keep your balance, feel dizzy, or have trouble walking.

Get help quickly if you suddenly can’t see well, get a bad headache, feel confused, or have problems speaking or understanding.

“Caught early, it is often reversible,” says internist Jacob Teitelbaum, MD.

Don’t wait to see a doctor. Call 911. If you get a clot-buster drug within 4.5 hours of your first symptom, you can lower your risk of long-term disability from stroke.

2. Chest Pain

When it comes to chest pain, it’s better to be safe than sorry.

“Any chest pain, especially accompanied by sweating, pressure, shortness of breath, or nausea, should be evaluated by a medical professional right away,” says Shilpi Agarwal, MD, with One Medical Group in Washington, DC.

Chest pain or pressure can be a sign of heart disease or a heart attack, particularly if you feel it after being active. It may also mean that you have a blood clot moving into your lung, Teitelbaum says.

If your chest feels tight or heavy, and it lasts more than a few minutes or goes away and comes back again, get help. Don’t try to tough it out.

3. Tenderness and Pain in the Back of Your Lower Leg

This can be a symptom of a blood clot in your leg. It’s called deep vein thrombosis, or DVT. It can happen after you’ve been sitting for a long time, like on a long plane ride, or if you’re sick and have been in bed a long time.

If it’s a blood clot, you may feel the pain mostly when you stand or walk. You may also notice swelling.

It’s normal to feel tenderness after exercise. But if you also see redness and feel heat where it’s swollen or painful, call your doctor.

 

Teitelbaum says you can also check for what’s called the Homans sign. “If you flex your toes upward and it hurts, that’s also suggestive of a blood clot,” he says. “But don’t rely on that. If it’s hot, red, and swollen on one side, go to the ER.”

 

It’s important to catch a blood clot before it can break off and block your blood flow, which can lead to complications.

4. Blood in Your Urine

Several things can cause you to see blood when you pee.

If you have blood in your urine and you also feel a lot of pain in your side or in your back, you may have kidney stones. A kidney stone is a small crystal made of minerals and salts that forms in your kidney and moves through the tube that carries your urine.

Your doctor may take X-rays or do an ultrasound to see the stones. An X-ray uses radiation in low doses to make images of structures inside your body. An ultrasound makes images with sound waves.

Many kidney stones eventually pass through your body when you pee. Sometimes your doctor may need to remove the kidney stone.

If you see blood in your urine and you also have an increase in feeling that you urgently need to pee, make frequent trips to the bathroom, or feel burning when you urinate, you may have a severe bladder orkidney infection, Teitelbaum says. Don’t wait to see your doctor, especially if you have a fever.

If you see blood but don’t feel any pain, it may be a sign of kidney orbladder cancer, so visit your doctor.

5. Wheezing

Breathing problems should be treated right away. If you’re wheezing, or hear a whistling sound when you breathe, see your doctor.

“Without urgent evaluation, breathing can quickly become labored, and it can be catastrophic if not evaluated and treated quickly,” Agarwal says.

It may be from asthma, a lung disease, a severe allergy, or exposure to chemicals. Your doctor can figure out what’s causing it and how to treat it. If you have asthma, an allergist will create a plan to manage it and reduce flare-ups.

Wheezing can also be caused by pneumonia or bronchitis. Are youcoughing up yellow or green mucus? Do you also have a fever or shortness of breath? If so, you may have bronchitis that’s turning into pneumonia. “Time to see your doctor,” Teitelbaum says.

6. Suicidal Thoughts

If you feel hopeless or trapped, or think you have no reason to live, get help. Talking to a professional can help you make it through a crisis.

Go to a hospital emergency room or a walk-in clinic at a psychiatric hospital. A doctor or mental health professional will talk to you, keep you safe, and help you get through this tough time.

You can also call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). It’s free and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It’s confidential, so you can feel safe about sharing your thoughts.

36 Things People With Anxiety Want Their Friends to Know

By Sarah Schuster

Unanswered text messages. Declined invites. Missed calls. When you live with anxiety, sometimes little aspects of friendship can be hard. But that doesn’t mean people with anxiety can’t maintain friendships. And it doesn’t mean people with anxiety don’t care about their friends.

We asked our Mighty readers who live with anxiety what they want their friends to know.

Here’s what they had to say: 

1. “It may seem irrational to you, but what I’m anxious about is very real for me.” — Paige Johnson

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2. “I never know when it’s going to hit me. And when it does, I just need you to support me.” — Dani Hazlewood

3. “I’m not just blowing you off. It’s hard to make plans and just as hard to talk on the phone sometimes. It doesn’t mean I don’t desperately want to spend time and talk. I just can’t.” — Marie Abbott Belcher

4. “Don’t give up on me when I isolate myself.” — Jen Jolly

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5. “Just having someone you love and trust reminding you to breathe sometimes really helps.” — Tania Lynne Sidiqi

 

6. “Be patient with me; it doesn’t always look like a full-blown panic attack. It sometimes comes out in the form of anger or what looks like major frustration.” — Tabitha Rainey

7. “Even when things are wonderful, I’m always waiting for something horrible to happen.” — Lindsay Ballard

8. “When I’m being quiet, I’m not sad, bored, tired or whatever else they want to fill in the blank with. There’s just so much going on in my mind, sometimes I can’t keep up with what’s going on around me.” — Amanda Jade Briskar

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9. “I can’t just turn it off.” — Katie Keepman

10. “Sometimes when I’m feeling the anxiety, I have no idea why I’m anxious.” — Laura Hernandez

11. “Everything can change in less than 30 seconds. Too many people in one area, no known exits in a certain situation — the list goes on.” — Ashleigh Young

12. “For real — it’s not you, it’s me. Generalized anxiety feels like drowning all the time. Most times life in general intensifies that feeling. If I have a hard time making plans, don’t take it personally.” — Cory Lee Tyler

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13. “When you ask, ‘Are you OK?’ you might think I don’t trust you when I say, “Yes, I’m good!” But in my mind, I think you’ll stop seeing me as a kind, funny and calm person if you knew the truth.” — Arianne Gaudet

14. “I’m sorry. I’m sorry for every invite I’ve declined, every time I’ve seemed irrational or nasty because I was overwhelmed or scared. I’m sorry for every time I’ve said I’d do something but then backed out. I’m sorry my anxiety hurts you, too.” — Melissa Kapuszcak

15. “Anxiety doesn’t have a ‘look.’ I don’t have to be trembling or hyperventilating to be anxious.” — Vicki Blank

16. “I need you to reach out to me, even when I’m so anxious I’ve stopped leaving the house. I need to know someone still cares and wants to see me.” — Hayley Lyvers

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17. “Don’t shut me out. My anxiety may stop me from doing certain things, but just being asked to join in can sometimes make my day.” — Vikki Rose Donaghy

 

18. “I analyze things constantly because of anxiety. I cannot turn my brain off and it can be exhausting.” — Cailea Hiller

19. “Anxiety is not an attitude.” — Clare Goodwin

20.It’s not your job to fix me. Please just love me the way I am.” — Carole Detweiler Oranzi

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21.I want to first apologize for the hundreds of times I’ve bailed on you. The hundreds of times I had to leave early and you had no clue. The hundreds of times I had to tell you no.” — Mary Kate Donahue

22.Most of the time you won’t know I’m having anxiety unless I tell you,” — Kylie Wagner-Grobman

23. “If I’m not comfortable doing something, just let it go. Don’t try to convince me — it makes it worse.” — Jennifer DiTaranto

24. “I’m not a flake. Sometimes anxiety stops me from doing social things. I might cancel at the last minute, but it’s never out of unfriendliness or being lazy. Know that if you need me, I’ll be there for you in any way I can.” — Bridget Hamilton

25. “I don’t know what’s happening in my head a lot of the time either. I understand you don’t get it, but your efforts mean the world to me.” — Avery Roe

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26. “Please don’t tell me to just get over it or that I’m being silly.” — Carla Estevez

27. “When I cancel plans with you it’s because I’m afraid to admit I’m a heaping mess. It has nothing to do with you… and everything to do with my panic attack.” — Dorie Cabasag-Smith

28. “Keep inviting me to group things even though I usually decline. Some days I feel stronger than others, so my answer might surprise you. Be patient.” — Kara Edkins

29. “Don’t take it personally when I don’t want to go out. My comfort zone is my home. It’s my safe place.” — Elizabeth Vasquez

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30. “When I say I can’t take on even one more thing, I really need you to understand I really just can’t.” — Christine L Hauck

31. “When I can’t do something, no one is more disappointed than me. Please try to understand that.” — Lindsey Hemphill

32. “Sometimes I just need to be alone. It’s not personal. I’m not mad. I don’t have some problem. I don’t just need to shake it off and do something fun. I just need to be alone so I can reset myself and breathe a little.” — Stacey Weber

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33. “Every time I talk to you, I go over every word of the conversation many times in my head. If I said something I feel I like I shouldn’t have said, even if it’s as simple as incorrect grammar, I will obsess about it for years.” — Chelsea Noelani Gober

34. “I’m still me. I’m not my anxiety.” — Abi Wylie

35. “I know it can seem ridiculous at time, but please, please, please just love me through it.” — Melissa Renee Wilkerson

36. “Give me some space, but don’t forget me.” — Vickie Boyette

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*Some responses have been edited and shortened for brevity

Want to learn more about managing anxiety? Visit Half of Us.

SHEMAR MOORE FIGHTS FOR MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS RESEARCH

The Criminal Minds star will be honored by the National MS Society in September

It looks like Shemar Moore is a hero on and off-camera. The beloved actor, who stars as SSA Derek Morgan on Criminal Minds, will be honored alongside his mother Marilyn by both the Southern California and Nevada Chapters of the National MS Society on Sept. 3.

Had the opportunity to sit down and talk with the folks from people.com to talk about my”SUPER WOMAN”, my heart….my mom!!! Check out the article: http://www.people.com/article/shemar-moore-mom-multiple-sclerosis

Since the Criminal Minds star’s mother was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 1999, the star has dedicated himself to learning as much as he can, as well as educating others, about the debilitating disease.

Moore regularly attends the Annual MS Dinner of Champions Gala and encourages fans to participate in other MS related-events and causes. This year, he held a competition—with a prize for two winners to fly to Los Angeles to attend the 2015 MS Dinner of Champions as his special guests—to both spread awareness about the disease and to thank his fans for their continuous outpouring of support.

Along with proceeds from his Baby Girl clothing line, participation in the Bike MS: Coastal Challenge, and various fan-outreach funding opportunities, Moore has raised a significant amount of money towards the study of Multiple Sclerosis.

In 2006, Moore—along with co-starThomas Gibson—formed a 15 member Criminal Minds crew to bike 100 miles, raising more than $20,000 for MS research and programs. He has continued the Bike MS challenge every year since.Marilyn, whom Moore describes as his “Super Woman,” is the driving force behind his mission to raise awareness about the disease and fundraising efforts to finding a cure. The Moores’ support has made a huge impact on the mission of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society: to fight for the cure.

The United States’ new Surgeon General, Vivek Murthy, indicated that medical cannabis can help some patients and the measles vaccine is safe and effective

The United States’ new Surgeon General, Vivek Murthy, indicated that medical cannabis can help some patients and the measles vaccine is safe and effective.

Dr. Murthy, who is making history as the youngest surgeon general and the first to be of Indian descent, discussed the safety of the measles vaccine and his views on medical marijuana as he joined CBS This Morning for his first on-camera interview since his position as surgeon general was confirmed, CBS Newsreported.

Murthy’s words could increase pressure on the Justice Department to redesignate marijuana, Reuters Ian Simpson reported via Business Insider.

Marijuana (cannabis) is listed as a Schedule I drug on the DEA’s website. Schedule I drugs include heroin, LSD, ecstasy, methaqualone, and peyote.

Methamphetamine, cocaine, oxycodone (OxyContin), fentanyl, Ritalin, Adderall, and Dilaudid are examples of schedule II narcotics.

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Schedule III drugs include codeine, Vicodin, ketamine, anabolic steroids, and testosterone. Schedule IV drugs include Xanax, Darvocet, Valium, Ambien, Ativan, Talwin, Darvon, and Soma.

In the CBS interview, the surgeon general indicated that the medical effectiveness of marijuana had been exhibited scientifically and much more information about it was en route. He went on to say that we have “some preliminary data” which shows “marijuana can be helpful” for some medical conditions and symptoms.

“We have some preliminary data showing that for certain medical conditions and symptoms, marijuana can be helpful […] I think we have to use that data to drive policy making, and I’m very interested to see where that data takes us.”

Twenty-three states, including Washington, D.C., have legalized medical marijuana, RT reported. The report indicated that the federal government’s Schedule I classification of cannabis under the Controlled Substance Act means that the plant has “no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.”

In regards to America’s top doctor’s recently expressed view on marijuana, The Hill tweeted the following the following to their more than half a million Twitter followers.

 

Murthy indicated to CBS that we must “see what the science” tells us about “the efficacy of marijuana” and that he thinks we’re going to obtain “a lot more data on that.”

Universities seeking federal research funding or federal financial aid to study cannabis are out of luck due to its Schedule I drug classification. However, researchers at places like John Hopkins School of Medicine are researching the effects marijuana has on those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), RTindicated in a report.

In related marijuana news on Inquisitr, a new scientific study has proven that smoking marijuana does not kill brain cells. Also, if you haven’t heard, there’s a new social networking app for stoners called “High There!” that looks to connect like-minded potheads, and Letroy Guion was arrested with a bunch of cash, some pot, and a gun.

What do you think of Vivek’s comments on the measles vaccine and marijuana?

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Benefits of Cannabis for Alzheimer’s disease

What is Alzheimer?

Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative pathology that causes progressive and total loss of the cerebral functions in elderly people, especially memory. This disease affects about 30 million people worldwide, a number that will double in the following 20 years due to the aging of the popolation in the industrialized world. Alzheimer affects more women than men, especially because women live longer and this disease development is closely linked with aging.

Alzheimer's disease damages brain cells

Today, in Spain, more than 600.000 people suffer from Alzheimer’s disease, with 40.000 new cases every year. Once the disease starts affecting the person, life expectancy greatly depends on patients (from 3 to 20 years), with an average of 8,5 years. Patient associations estimate that we’ll have around 1,5 million people suffering from Alzheimer in Spain by 2050. (Source: Spanish Society of Neurology).

Although a balanced nutrition – and regular brain stimulation – can have protective and preventive effects, we still don’t have any effective treatment for Alzheimer’s disease once it is active.

During the past years, the cannabis plant and its beneficial properties have become a new hopeful treatment for Alzheimer’s disease patients, who are increasingly following this new treatment. We’ll see now how the active principles of this plant can combat Alzheimer’s symptoms.

How does cannabis combat Alzheimer’s disease?

Cannabinoids represent a new and interesting option to prevent and impede the development of symptoms of Alzheimer, since they act differently against this pathology:

  • They reduce aggregation of beta-amyloid peptide, which is the main indicator of Alzheimer’s disease. They also inhibit phosphorylation of Tau protein, another biological indicator of this condition. (See studies #2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 10)
  • They protect neurons – although many media state the opposite – since cannabinoids are not neurotoxic (compared to alcohol, nicotine and some medicines). They actually protect our neurons! (See studies #2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11). Indeed, the government of the USA already registered the patent US 6,630,507 back in 2003, which protects the use of cannabinoids asanti-oxidants and neuroprotective agents.

Cannabis patient

  • They stimulate neurogenesis (development of new neurons), especially in the brain’s hippocampus. (See studies #2, 4, 6, 7, 9)
  • They reduce inflammation of the neurons, partially thanks to the anti-inflammatory properties of cannabinoids, but also by reducing the production of cytokines and other proinflammatory molecules. (See studies #2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 11)

Marijuana against Alzheimer's disease

  • THC can reduce the activity of acetyl cholinesterase enzyme, enhancing cholinergic neurotransmission and preventing the development of the disease. (See studies #2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10) Cannabinoids also improve the activity of mitochondria – responsible for energy production in the cells – especially by reducing the production of free radicals responsible for oxidative stress. (See studies #2, 3, 4)
  • Finally, cannabinoids improve mood, appetite and sleep while reducing stress, anxiety and agressiveness. This improvement of the quality of life is highly appreciated by both patients and their relatives, who know how difficult it is to deal with Alzheimer’s disease.

Cannabis and Alzheimer's disease

How to use marijuana to treat Alzheimer’s disease?

Medical cannabis can be used in several ways. While smoking buds (without tobacco!) is the easiest and fastest way, it is not the most appropriate manner if we want to take care of our respiratory system. A good alternative is vaping cannabis, so we can assimilate its active and aromatic principles without combustion, which is a much safer manner. We can also make oils and use them withcapsules or directly in our favourite dishes.

A few drops of cannabis oil can be very beneficial

Unfortunately, we still don’t have specific dosages of cannabis to treat Alzheimer’s disease. Thus, each patient must find his/her own dosage, starting with very small doses that can be progressively increased dependiing on the observed effects. Telling our doctor that we are following this treatment is also recommended so there are no incompatibilities with other medicines (or with our health state).

Since both cannabinoids – THC and CBD – have complementary beneficial properties that act against the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, a good choice is using cannabis strains with balanced THC:CBD ratio (1:1). If the patient doesn’t tolerate the psychoactive effects of THC, varieties like CBD Therapy are almost completely free from this cannabinoid.

Using medical marijuana

Scientific studies on the action of cannabinoids on Alzheimer’s disease

For the most sceptical ones, and also for those who want to deepen their knowledge of this subject, here you have a list of 11 recentscientific publications about the use of cannabinoids from the marijuana plant to treat Alzheimer’s disease:

1.- Safety and Efficacy of Medical Cannabis Oil for Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia: An-Open Label, Add-On, Pilot Study. Published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s disease, January 2016. While the complete version of this study is not available to the public yet, the conclusion indicates that cannabis oil (THC-rich) would be a promising and safe treatment for Alzheimer’s patients.

2.- The Role of Endocannabinoid Signaling in the Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s Disease. Published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s disease, August 2014.

3.- The Potential Therapeutic Effects of THC on Alzheimer’s Disease. Published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s disease, August 2014.

Beneficial effects of cannabinoids on Alzheimer's disease

4.- Cannabinoids for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease: moving toward the clinic. Published in Frontiers in Pharmacology magazine, March 2014.

5.- Multitarget cannabinoids as novel strategy for Alzheimer disease. Published in Current Alzheimer Research, March 2013.

6.- The therapeutic potential of the endocannabinoid system for Alzheimer’s disease. Published in Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Targets, March 2012.

7.- Cannabidiol Reduces Ab-Induced Neuroinflammation and Promotes Hippocampal Neurogenesis through PPARc Involvement. Published in PIoS ONE magazine, December 2011.

the endocannabinoid system and Alzheimer's disease

8.- Cannabidiol and Other Cannabinoids Reduce Microglial Activation In Vitro and In Vivo: Relevance to Alzheimer’s Disease. Published in Molecular Pharmacology, February 2011.

9.- Alzheimer’s disease; taking the edge off with cannabinoids? Published in the British Journal of Pharmacology, September 2007.

10.- A Molecular Link Between the Active Component of Marijuana and Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology. Published in the Molecular Pharmaceutics magazine, November 2006.

11.- Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology by Cannabinoids: Neuroprotection Mediated by Blockade of Microglial Activation. Published in the Journal of Neuroscience, February 2005.

Do not hesitate to share this information with your friends and acquaintances, also with any health professional or patient in your social environment.

A patient using medical cannabis with a pipe

Cannabis patient

Cannabis Science 101: The Physics and Chemistry of the Joint

By Bruce Barcott

When a joint gets passed around, it tends to bring out the armchair scientists.

Everyone has a theory. And most theories sound like they come straight from the mind of Ron Slater, Dazed and Confused’s stoner historian. There’s the temperature theorist, who’s convinced you’ve got to keep the joint hot. And the long-toke artist. And the many-short-hits believer.

Who’s right? Let’s look into the actual science of the joint, or as the peer-reviewed journals refer to it, the marijuana cigarette.

First, a primer about why cannabis is burned and smoked in the first place. Eating a gram of cured flower straight out of the bag is a bad idea. It’ll taste like eating Kentucky bluegrass, and you won’t get the desired effect. The THC in the plant needs to undergo a process known as decarboxylation to become psychoactively available. Ed Rosenthal, one of the world’s leading experts on cannabis biology, explains the rest in this excerpt from one of his columns:

Marijuana produces THCA, an acid with the carboxylic group (COOH) attached. In its acid form, THC is not very active. It is only when the carboxyl group is removed that THC becomes psychoactive. When marijuana is smoked, the THC behind the hot spot is vaporized as the hot air from the burn is drawn through the joint or pipe bowl to the unburned material.

What's the Difference Between Joints, Blunts, and Spliffs?

 

How Much THC Moves From Leaf to Bloodstream?

Budding cannabis flower on live plan in outdoor field

One of the earliest NIDA (National Institute on Drug Abuse) studies on cannabis cigarettes, conducted in 1982 by NIDA researcher Richard L. Hawks, estimated that 20 percent of the THC in a cannabis cigarette was delivered to the body when the smoker took a 5-second puff each minute. All the rest was lost to pyrolysis (burning) and sidestream smoke (the rising stuff from the smoldering end).

A later 1990 study by Mario Perez-Reyes, a psychiatric researcher at the University of North Carolina, put more specific figures to the path taken by THC. He estimated that 20 to 37 percent of the THC in a joint hits the consumer in mainstream smoke. Twenty-three to 30 percent is lost to pyrolytic destruction, and 40 to 50 percent goes up in sidestream smoke.

What's in a Pre-Roll?

In these early studies, the scientific concern was all about THC. Other cannabinoids, like cannabidiol (CBD), and terpenes weren’t yet widely known. Also worth noting: All of these American studies were conducted using low-quality, low-potency (1.5 to 3 percent THC) cannabis supplied by NIDA.

Those estimates allow us to run some interesting numbers. If the average joint contains about 700 milligrams of cannabis flower — that’s the “scientific test joint” configuration — and today’s average THC level runs around 20 percent, that means 140 mg of THC are available in each joint. If 20 to 37 percent of that carries to the lungs, that’s a THC dose of 28 to 52 mg. Before you start comparing that to THC milligrams in edibles, though, consider that the body metabolizes and reacts to edibles differently than it does to inhaled smoke.

 

More Short Puffs, or Fewer Long Draws?

Woman puffs on cannabis joint

A 2008 study conducted by researchers at Leiden University, in the Netherlands, using much better cannabis (17.4 percent THC) supplied by Bedrocan, the company that grows pharmacy-grade cannabis for the Dutch Ministry of Health, specifically tested the toke question. Using joints with 700 mg of flower, volunteers tried a puff every which way. They took a two-second pull every 15 seconds, then every 30 seconds, then every 60. They tried a two-second pull, a three-second pull, and a four. Then the researchers drew blood from the subjects and measured their plasma THC levels. THC levels in the blood stair-stepped, as expected, in nearly every case. In other words, a longer toke drew more THC into the blood. A greater volume of inhaled smoke did the same.

Leafly's Visual Quality Guide to Selecting Cannabis

But here’s the interesting thing. The short, two-second puff every 30 seconds and every 60 seconds yielded about the same amount of THC, around 22 nanograms per milliliter. But the same puff every 15 seconds doubled the THC intake, to 44 ng/ml.

The conclusion: The average overall temperature of the joint remained higher when a toke was taken every 15 seconds. That kept the whole THC decarboxylation and delivery system up and running. When the joint was allowed to rest for 30 or 60 seconds, it cooled. It’s the difference between keeping a machine running and or shutting it down and starting it back up again. Plus, as a number of these study authors noted, cannabis cigarettes don’t burn nearly as evenly or well as tobacco cigarettes. If you leave them untended for too long, they have a tendency to extinguish themselves.

Perez-Reyes observed a similar dynamic during his 1990 study. He asked study subjects to smoke joints extremely fast — a hit every six seconds — and then more slowly, taking a drag every 17 seconds. Which is still pretty fast. And his subjects got really high. The six-second-interval smokers registered peak THC blood plasma levels of 210 to 230 ng/ml. The 17-second-interval smokers hit 100 to 160 ng/ml. The legal limit for impaired driving in both Washington and Colorado is 5 ng/ml.

 

Delivery Efficiency: Joint vs. Vape vs. Bong

Pile of rolled cannabis joints on blue table

Nobody’s actually done an apples-to-apples-to-apples study on the question, or at least not one that’s been published in a peer-reviewed journal. But there is some information to be gleaned.

In 2007, Donald Abrams, a pioneering AIDS and medical cannabis researcher at the University of California at San Francisco, published a study of THC intake via the Volcano vaporizer. Abrams tested the vaporizer as a safer alternative to cannabis cigarettes. He was responding to a 1999 Institute of Medicine Report that found medical value in cannabis but hedged against recommending medical marijuana “because of the health risks associated with smoking.”

Cannabis Science 101: The Complex Chemistry of the Bong

Abrams did find vaporization to be healthier. Compared to a smoked joint, the Volcano produced far less tar, carbon monoxide, and other combustion byproducts while delivering almost identical blood-THC levels. The vaporizer captured 54 percent of the THC in the leaf, as compared to the 20 to 37 percent available from a joint.

Bongs, by comparison, may deliver less THC per gram of flower. Perez-Reyes found that peak blood THC levels among his subjects using a water pipe were about 50 percent lower than the blood THC levels among the same subjects smoking the same amount of cannabis in a joint. That finding may lend credence to those who wonder if bong water is filtering out some of the cannabinoids that consumers desire.

 

Self-Titration is a Real Thing

Woman holding cannabis joint and while smoke emits after she inhales

For UCSF’s Donald Abrams, the most surprising data from his 2007 study may have come in the area of titration — a factor involving concentrations of THC in the blood (more later). He asked his subject to consume three different potencies: 1.7 percent THC, 3.4 percent, and 6.8 percent. Under perfect conditions, the blood-THC levels of the subjects should have stair-stepped along with the increased potencies.

Surprise! They didn’t.

Smoking the 1.7 percent THC cannabis, his volunteers peaked at blood THC levels of 80 ng/ml. At double the leaf potency (3.4 percent THC), they peaked at 110 ng/ml. And at four times the potency (6.8 percent), they peaked at 120 ng/ml.

Even though the Volcano captured a higher percentage of THC compared to a joint, blood plasma THC levels in the subjects using those devices were comparable.

Here’s the really interesting part: Subjects in Abrams’ study didn’t know the THC content when they were consuming.

That suggests that the study subjects carried out some sort of self-titration, whether they were aware of it or not. Titration is a fancy word for dosing. Self-titration means smokers adapt their smoking behavior to obtain desired levels of THC from the particular delivery system, taking more puffs and/or inhaling more efficiently at lower, compared to higher, THC strengths. “The phenomenon of self-titration of psychoactive drug intake from an inhaled delivery system is well documented for nicotine from cigarette smoking,” Abrams wrote, “but to our knowledge has not been previously reported for marijuana.”

Abrams’ study has interesting policy implications as well. One of the arguments used against recreational legalization is the fear that today’s higher-THC cannabis “is not the pot you knew in the 1970s.” That’s true. But it may also be true that consumers are simply inhaling less smoke or vapor than they did in the ’70s to achieve similar results.

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